Twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary. Twelfth Night, or What You Will Act 4, Scene 3 Summary 2019-01-17

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Twelfth Night Act 1 Summary and Analysis

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

When Toby brags that Aguecheek's super rich, Maria scoffs that he'll probably burn through his cash within the year because he's an idiot who does nothing but drink. He is a romantic character who believes in love at first sight and might be more interested in the idea of love in general than in the object of his affection as an individual. Sir Toby, Maria, and company prove themselves as capital jokers, and very ably carry out their prank to its fruition. Orsino's fool, Feste, brings a letter from Malvolio, and on his release, Maria's letter is revealed to be fraudulent. That conclusion, however, is uncertain; though Viola does admit that Feste is more perceptive than most of the people she has come across, and by her estimation, should have the intelligence to be able to see through her disguise. The language of Scene 5 is less laden with literary elements than the language of the previous scenes, because of the temperaments of Olivia and the others involved, and also because of Olivia's focus on getting the plain truth out of people. Orsino was the name of the prominent dukes of Bracciano, who presided over an area in Tuscany; names like , Viola, Maria, and are Italian in origin as well.

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Notes on Act 1, Scene 3 from Twelfth Night

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

Olivia's language contrasts sharply with Viola's in this scene, further revealing the depth of Olivia's passion. They ask the fool to sing for them and Sir Andrew compliments his singing voice and how funny he was the other night when he was performing. Viola laments the loss of her twin brother, Sebastian, in the shipwreck. Malvolio, in his zest for making amorous overtures to Olivia in Scene 4, alludes to a few popular, but bawdy Elizabethan-era songs to try and get his point across to Olivia. Maria scoffs that this makes no difference. Orsino then contrasts love, which steals away the value of things, and the sea, which transforms things.

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Twelfth Night Act 1, Scene 3 Translation

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

Viola, however, is more generous in her behavior toward Feste; she gives him money, though they are of similar station, while Feste tries to get even more money out of her. Just then Andrew arrives, and he clearly is a complete fool. Furious, Malvolio yells at Maria that if she respected her mistress, she would reprimand these lowlifes. They also dug his stand-up comic routine and hope he got the money they left him as a tip. Lesson Summary In Act 2 Scene 3 of Twelfth Night, Toby, Andrew, and the fool are drinking, singing, and dancing late at night. She sends her proud steward, Malvolio, after him with a ring.

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Twelfth Night, or What You Will Act 1, Scene 3 Summary

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

Feste is characterized as a kind of mercenary, while Viola is shown to be even-tempered and slow to anger as well. These include Olivia's uncle, Sir Toby Belch, her servant, Maria, and Sir Toby's friend, Sir Andrew Aguecheek. His compact sentences and short words attest to this: 'This is the air; that is the glorious sun. What do you mean by this? His character is played for the sake of exposition, and through his tendency to talk aloud to himself, he reminds the audience of the contents of the letter, his motivations, and he reveals his character more fully. Feste's got a great set of pipes and the crowd enjoyed themselves on dance floor. Viola does well at turning Olivia's questions back to the subject of Orsino; Viola fully adopts the words, manner, and tone of a servant addressing someone of higher rank, though Viola's impersonal replies only make Olivia more determined. His friend tries to convince him that Olivia is only pretending to favor Cesario, in order to make Sir Andrew jealous; his lie is well-intentioned, but does not soothe Sir Andrew's anger.

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Twelfth Night, or What You Will Act 2, Scene 3 Summary

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

But then, he relates the topic of hunting to his lovelorn condition; he alludes to Ovid's account of Actaeon, who was punished for seeing the goddess Diana naked by being turned into a hart, and then attacked by his own dogs. Sebastian, trained in combat, wins the fight. The duke then says he wants to go sit in the garden. At the time, Sebastian was fighting a duel with her cousin. The language that Orsino uses in this first scene may be full of artifice; but it also indicates a capacity for strong feeling and great vitality.

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Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 3 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

The Countess Olivia has mistaken Sebastian for 'Cesario' Sebastian's disguised twin sister, Viola , with whom she is in love. Scene 5: 's first appearance in the play; unlike Sir Toby and Sir Andrew, who make wordplay by mincing each other's meanings, Feste is more perceptive and quick-witted, and gets into an entertaining argument with the equally quick-witted Maria. Twelfth Night Act 1, Scene 3 , Olivia's drunken relative, talks with , her maid. A pearl, Olivia's present to Sebastian, was symbolic in Shakespeare's time not only of wealth and status, but of a woman's virginity. Critics have questioned the relationship between these two, as they seem to be even closer than Orsino and Viola, and with less demonstrated cause; perhaps Antonio feels beholden to Sebastian after rescuing him from the wreck, but the relationship is rather murky. These qualities lead to Viola and Orsino coming together, and are shown in his proofs of love, and of friendship to Viola. Maria is annoyed at Malvolio, but begs Sir Toby and Sir Andrew to quiet down because ever since Olivia saw Cesario earlier that day, she has been badly distressed.

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Scene 3

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

Orsino does not seem upset by this. Sir Andrew also happens to be seeking the hand of Olivia. Viola chooses to be presented to Orsino as a eunuch so that her high-pitched voice does not seem odd, and so that she will seem less threatening to Orsino. Malvolio, proud and self-righteous, objects to how the other servants' make his high-class household look common. At that moment, Maria, the servant, enters and scolds the men for making such a racket.

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Twelfth Night, or What You Will Act 3, Scene 1 Summary

twelfth night act 1 scene 3 summary

Her tone is not as richly poetic or filled with extravagant imagery as Orsino's; her words are more plain and straightforward, denoting grief but also her sensibility. He continues to daydream about how wonderful she is. Olivia dismisses Malvolio's odd behavior as being some kind of passing madness, and orders that Malvolio be looked after while she sees to Cesario, who has supposedly returned. Unlike Malvolio, who tries to present an image of greater stature, Olivia and Toby want to be seen as exactly what they are, and are fiercely proud of their station. The duke affirms that he is hunting, but for heart instead of hart. Also, Viola speaks of the real divide between wisdom and knowledge; those who appear, or wish to appear as wise, like Malvolio, are often greater fools than Feste, who hides his knowledge behind his shows of foolery. It is very late and they decide they might as well stay up all night; Toby argues that if you stay up past midnight into the wee hours of the morning, you are actually going to bed early.

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