Chautauqua movement. The Chautauqua Movement 2019-01-07

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Chautauqua Movement

chautauqua movement

Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle. Still, the sort of mild Protestantism that has informed much of American culture was an underpinning of the Chautauqua Movement. From its inception in 1874, Chautauqua tailored its appeal to the patriotic, churchgoing, white, native-born, mostly Protestant, northern and Midwestern middle classes—a group whose claim to represent Americans as a whole has been alternatively championed and criticized. By the last decade of the nineteenth century, the Chautauqua Institution was nationally known as a center for rather earnest, but high-minded, activities that aimed at intellectual and moral self-improvement and civic involvement. The influence of the original assembly gave rise to many independent or permanent Chautauquas —more than 150 by 1904 —set up in natural surroundings similar to Chautauqua Lake and organized to advance education among the masses.

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Chapter 25 vocab APUSH Flashcards

chautauqua movement

Many of these speakers were reformers and politicians. Coming from a rural background himself, as a reverent Christian, he encapsulated many of the same values and outlooks of his audience. Lesson Summary During the later 19th and early 20th-century, Chautauquas were one of the most popular forms of entertainment in rural America. The boundaries between the two began to blur, and soon many Chautauqua performers began to try to broaden their appeal and become more than just platform readers so they could cross over to the vaudeville side, taking part in both forms in their eagerness to gain more money and fame. After the programs began to lose audience interest, and the movement had almost entirely disappeared by the 1930s in part because of the growing influence of radio and films.

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Chautauqua Movement History

chautauqua movement

By 1874, their idea had become reality and the Chautauqua Institution offered a nine-week summer session of courses. Many Americans saw their first movies in chautauqua tents. Along with the educational and education was broadly defined to include the arts and public affairs offerings at Chautauqua, its thousands of summer residents attended concerts and social activities. Competing perspectives on virtually every major social issue of the twentieth century have at one time or another found their way to the Chautauqua platform. Other communities were inspired to form local Chautauquas, and possibly 200—300 were organized, though few were so successful as the original. Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois Press.

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Chapter 25 vocab APUSH Flashcards

chautauqua movement

The first Settlement House was the Hull House, which was opened by Jane Addams in Chicago in 1889. Their arrival brought people together to improve their minds and renew their ties to one another. They mailed courses of home study to interested students and sent speakers traveling on a circuit to over two hundred Chautauquas around the country. Rockefeller to head that institution. In the mid-1920s, the rise of commercial radio, movies, automobiles, and an expanded consumer culture signaled the end of the circuits' popularity in rural America.


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Chautauqua

chautauqua movement

For example, during the 1936 season at the , in anticipation of the national election held that year for president, visitors heard addresses by , his challenger , and from two candidates. Most important, the Circuit Chautauqua experience was critical in stimulating thought and discussion on important political, social and cultural issues of the day. He believed that blacks must first gain economic equality before they gain social equality. More closely carrying on the spirit of the Chautauqua Movement are programs for educators organized by universities the National Science Foundation has been active in this and even a chautauqua that travels around the mid-Atlantic states in the summers presenting everything from symposia to juggling. The Birth of the Chautauqua The Chautauqua was born in 1874 when John Heyl Vincent and Lewis Miller first purchased the land of an old Methodist revival camp to use to educate Sunday school teachers during the summer. Although no longer a source of new ideas, Chautauqua continued and continues to champion the major themes of modern liberal thought in America: humanistic education, religious tolerance, and faith in social progress.

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The Chautauqua Movement: Origins & Facts

chautauqua movement

However, with the outbreak of the Civil War, all potential officers were needed, and he was called to serve with the Union Army. Cast of One: One-Person Shows from the Chautauqua Platform to the Broadway Stage. These Daughter Chautauquas, as they came to be known, were created to bring the same form of lectures, music, and education to the masses like the original. The movement pretty much died out by the mid-1930s. When professional and educational opportunities increased, interest in chautauquas dwindled.

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Chautauqua Movement

chautauqua movement

Over time, as vaudeville became more respectable, Chautauqua became more liberal and secular. Its eight-week summer program combined Bible study with courses in science, history, literature, and the arts, while giving visibility to social gospel—minded academics, politicians, preachers, prohibitionists, and reformers. The influence of Chautauqua upon the pattern of higher education in the United States was also great, due mainly to the action of William Rainey Harper—one of Chautauqua's leading personalities—in practically duplicating Chautauqua's organizational structure at the then new University of Chicago when he was chosen by John D. A revitalized and more effective , Vincent reasoned, would root evangelical Protestantism in the more solid foundation of biblical learning, secular study, and middle-class prosperity. Hall Auditorium, Bay View, Mich.

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The Chautauqua Movement

chautauqua movement

Adapted from content contributed by the Colorado Chautauqua. One of the leaders of the Sioux tribe. Anthony 1820—1906 , inventors 1847—1922 and 1863—1947 , Helen Keller 1880—1968 , and nine presidents of the. At its zenith, the Chautauqua officials also operated a large publishing house and a theological school. Thousands attended each year; for those who could not, there were courses for home study groups, and lecturers were sent out to supplement the material furnished from the organization's publishing house. A group of white Christian reformist tried to bring Christian beliefs on to the Indians. From its inception in 1874 down to the close of World War I, the widespread popularity of the Chautauqua movement constituted one of the most dramatic episodes in the history of American adult education.


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The Chautauqua Movement

chautauqua movement

Between 1985 and 1989 the institution initiated a series of exchanges with the during the time of perestroika. Today, chautauqua is experiencing a renaissance. The organizers achieved success through nationwide public lectures, often held in tents and featuring well-known speakers, including Mark Twain. Many of the lecturers and performers were contracted by chautauqua agencies—the most notable was the Redpath Agency in Iowa—and the quality of the offerings varied from Vassar-educated lecturers and Shakespeare to animal acts and vaudeville farce. A leader in women's activism and social reform.

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