Camus bibliography. Albert Camus: Existentialism and Absurdism 2019-01-22

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Albert Camus Biography and Bibliography

camus bibliography

By the time he finished his Baccalauréat degree in June 1932, Camus was already contributing articles to Sud, a literary monthly, and looking forward to a career in journalism, the arts, or higher education. Anne Prouteau et Agnès Spiquel. At heart a nature-worshipper, and by instinct a skeptic and non-believer, Camus nevertheless retained a lifelong interest and respect for Christian philosophy and literature. For Camus, following this reading of Nietzsche closely, the conventional solution is in fact the problem: hope is disastrous for humans inasmuch as it leads them to minimize the value of this life except as preparation for a life beyond. Maria José Vazquez de Parga, Rémy Poignault. Hope is the error Camus wishes to avoid.

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Albert Camus: Existentialism and Absurdism

camus bibliography

Thanks to the close attention paid by his grammar and high school teachers and against all odds, he was able to study and obtain, in 1935, a graduate degree in philosophy at the University of Algiers with an ambitious thesis entitled Christian Metaphysics and Neoplatonism. In Caligula the mad title character, in a fit of horror and revulsion at the meaninglessness of life, would rather die—and bring the world down with him—than accept a cosmos that is indifferent to human fate or that will not submit to his individual will. In short, he recommends a life without consolation, but instead one characterized by lucidity and by acute consciousness of and rebellion against its mortality and its limits. Behind the scenes, he began to work clandestinely for imprisoned Algerians who faced the death penalty. He was consistent in his call for non-aggression in Algeria see below.

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Albert Camus: Existentialism and Absurdism

camus bibliography

In reality, it is a dense and rich creation, full of undiscovered meanings and formal qualities. Revolution, despite its initial ideals, he sees as something that always ends in a cruelty as great or greater than the one it set out to destroy. But how is it possible that, by the end of The Myth of Sisyphus, Camus has moved from skepticism about finding the truth and nihilism about whether life has meaning to advocating an approach to life that is clearly judged to be better than others? He was also working on his ambitious next novel, Le Premier Homme The First Man. Camus, Philosophical Literature, and the Novel of Ideas To pin down exactly why and in what distinctive sense Camus may be termed a philosophical writer, we can begin by comparing him with other authors who have merited the designation. In 1949, upon his return to France from a South American tour, Camus became quite ill and went into almost total seclusion, only occasionally publishing collections of more of his political essays. Even after Francine gave birth to twins, Catherine and Jean, on 5 September 1945, he continued to joke to friends that he was not cut out for marriage.

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The Stranger (Camus novel)

camus bibliography

This led to further ostracism by French left-wing intellectuals. Tübingen: Francke, 1994 : 87-102. Anne-Marie Amiot et Jean-François Mattéi. Unfortunately, none of these latter projects would be brought to fulfillment. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 2000 : 39-68. Such a monster is not to be encountered in private life. For Camus the problem is that by demanding meaning, order, and unity, we seek to go beyond those limits and pursue the impossible.

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Albert Camus: Existentialism and Absurdism

camus bibliography

Number of titles added since January 1, 2012: 13 books, 116 articles or chapters in book. But what then is the appropriate path? Nietzsche explains that humans have come to see hope as their greatest good, while Zeus, knowing better, has meant it as the greatest source of trouble. In describing a fictional attack of bubonic plague a highly contagious outbreak of disease that causes many deaths in the Algerian city of Oran, he again treats the theme of the absurd, represented by the meaningless and totally unearned suffering and death caused by the plague. Archived from on 2 December 2013. Historical revolt, rooted in metaphysical revolt, leads to revolutions seeking to eliminate absurdity by using murder as their central tool to take total control over the world. Meursault and Clamence, it is worth noting, are presented not just as sinners, devils, and outcasts, but in several instances explicitly, and not entirely ironically, as Christ figures.

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Camus: a bibliography (Book, 1968) [snipe.fm]

camus bibliography

The novel was an autobiographical work about his childhood in. His discussion rests on the self-evidence of sensuous experience. Archived from on 13 May 2009. Only this time his primary concern is not suicide but murder. Hubert Faes et Guy Basset.

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Albert Camus Biography

camus bibliography

Camus considered the Absurd to be a fundamental and even defining characteristic of the modern human condition. Like Sisyphus, we are our fate, and our frustration is our very life: we can never escape it. He believes that only in man's courageous rebellion to confront himself and his world can he begin to create a civilization that can rescue itself from a nihilistic catastrophe. Sky and sea, mountain and desert, have their own beauty and magnificence and constitute a sufficient heaven. It also has a wider appeal, though, as a symbol of the fight against evil and suffering, the major moral problem of human experience.

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2.2. Études philosophiques/Philosophical Studies

camus bibliography

His specific targets were intellectuals attracted to Communism—as he himself had been in the 1930s. But how can an I lead to a we? After his death, two of Camus's works were published posthumously. Works in English Reference marks are given for cited English translations. As a journalist he had been one of the few to indict French colonialism, but he does not mention it, except in a footnote. He will die triumphant as the absurd man. The Columbia History of Twentieth-Century French Thought. Actes du 5ème Colloque international de Poitiers sur Albert Camus, le 29, 30 et 31 mai 2003.

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